Local Policies

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Local Policies
Section: Computer Configuration
Path: Policies \ Windows Settings \ Security Settings

The Local Policies section allows administrators to define the local computer's security and audit settings. Most of these settings are similar to the setting in the Local Group Policy Editor.

Contents

Audit Policy

Audit account logon events

Defines if Windows logs successful and/or failed attempt to validate an account's credentials.

Description:

This security setting determines whether the OS audits each time this computer validates an account’s credentials.

Account logon events are generated whenever a computer validates the credentials of an account for which it is authoritative. Domain members and non-domain-joined machines are authoritative for their local accounts; domain controllers are all authoritative for accounts in the domain. Credential validation may be in support of a local logon, or, in the case of an Active Directory domain account on a domain controller, may be in support of a logon to another computer. Credential validation is stateless so there is no corresponding logoff event for account logon events.

If this policy setting is defined, the administrator can specify whether to audit only successes, only failures, both successes and failures, or to not audit these events at all (i.e. neither successes nor failures).

Default values on Client editions:

 Credential Validation: No Auditing
 Kerberos Service Ticket Operations: No Auditing
 Other Account Logon Events: No Auditing
 Kerberos Authentication Service: No Auditing

Default values on Server editions:

 Credential Validation: Success
 Kerberos Service Ticket Operations: Success
 Other Account Logon Events: No Auditing
 Kerberos Authentication Service: Success

Important: For more control over auditing policies, use the settings in the Advanced Audit Policy Configuration node. For more information about Advanced Audit Policy Configuration, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140969.

Values: Success + Failure.

Audit account management events

Defines if Windows logs successful and/or failed management events like user group creation or disabling an user account.

Description:

This security setting determines whether to audit each event of account management on a computer. Examples of account management events include:

A user account or group is created, changed, or deleted. A user account is renamed, disabled, or enabled. A password is set or changed. If you define this policy setting, you can specify whether to audit successes, audit failures, or not audit the event type at all. Success audits generate an audit entry when any account management event succeeds. Failure audits generate an audit entry when any account management event fails. To set this value to No auditing, in the Properties dialog box for this policy setting, select the Define these policy settings check box and clear the Success and Failure check boxes.

Default values on Client editions:

 User Account Management: Success
 Computer Account Management: No Auditing
 Security Group Management: Success
 Distribution Group Management: No Auditing
 Application Group Management: No Auditing
 Other Account Management Events: No Auditing

Default values on Server editions:

 User Account Management: Success
 Computer Account Management: Success
 Security Group Management: Success
 Distribution Group Management: No Auditing
 Application Group Management: No Auditing
 Other Account Management Events: No Auditing

Important: For more control over auditing policies, use the settings in the Advanced Audit Policy Configuration node. For more information about Advanced Audit Policy Configuration, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140969.

Values: Success + Failure.

Audit directory service access events

Defines if Windows logs successful and/or failed attempts to access an Active Directory object.

Description:

This security setting determines whether the OS audits user attempts to access Active Directory objects. Audit is only generated for objects that have system access control lists (SACL) specified, and only if the type of access requested (such as Write, Read, or Modify) and the account making the request match the settings in the SACL.

The administrator can specify whether to audit only successes, only failures, both successes and failures, or to not audit these events at all (i.e. neither successes nor failures).

If Success auditing is enabled, an audit entry is generated each time any account successfully accesses a Directory object that has a matching SACL specified.

If Failure auditing is enabled, an audit entry is generated each time any user unsuccessfully attempts to access a Directory object that has a matching SACL specified.

Default values on Client editions:

 Directory Service Access: No Auditing
 Directory Service Changes: No Auditing
 Directory Service Replication: No Auditing
 Detailed Directory Service Replication: No Auditing

Default values on Server editions:

 Directory Service Access: Success
 Directory Service Changes: No Auditing Directory
 Service Replication: No Auditing
 Detailed Directory Service Replication: No Auditing

Important: For more control over auditing policies, use the settings in the Advanced Audit Policy Configuration node. For more information about Advanced Audit Policy Configuration, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140969.

Values: Success + Failure.

Audit logon events

Defines if Windows logs successful and/or failed attempts to logon of logoff to this computer.

Description:

This security setting determines whether the OS audits each instance of a user attempting to log on to or to log off to this computer.

Log off events are generated whenever a logged on user account's logon session is terminated. If this policy setting is defined, the administrator can specify whether to audit only successes, only failures, both successes and failures, or to not audit these events at all (i.e. neither successes nor failures).

Default values on Client editions:

 Logon: Success
 Logoff: Success
 Account Lockout: Success
 IPsec Main Mode: No Auditing
 IPsec Quick Mode: No Auditing
 IPsec Extended Mode: No Auditing
 Special Logon: Success
 Other Logon/Logoff Events: No Auditing
 Network Policy Server: Success, Failure

Default values on Server editions:

 Logon: Success, Failure
 Logoff: Success
 Account Lockout: Success
 IPsec Main Mode: No Auditing
 IPsec Quick Mode: No Auditing
 IPsec Extended Mode: No Auditing
 Special Logon: Success
 Other Logon/Logoff Events: No Auditing
 Network Policy Server: Success, Failure

Important: For more control over auditing policies, use the settings in the Advanced Audit Policy Configuration node. For more information about Advanced Audit Policy Configuration, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140969.

Values: Success + Failure.

Audit object access

Defines if Windows logs successful and/or failed attempts to access a non-Active Directory object. To define objects which will be audited, the Advanced Audit Policy Configuration or security tab in the management console can be used.

Description:

This security setting determines whether the OS audits user attempts to access non-Active Directory objects. Audit is only generated for objects that have system access control lists (SACL) specified, and only if the type of access requested (such as Write, Read, or Modify) and the account making the request match the settings in the SACL.

The administrator can specify whether to audit only successes, only failures, both successes and failures, or to not audit these events at all (i.e. neither successes nor failures).

If Success auditing is enabled, an audit entry is generated each time any account successfully accesses a non-Directory object that has a matching SACL specified.

If Failure auditing is enabled, an audit entry is generated each time any user unsuccessfully attempts to access a non-Directory object that has a matching SACL specified.

Note that you can set a SACL on a file system object using the Security tab in that object's Properties dialog box.

Default: No auditing.

Important: For more control over auditing policies, use the settings in the Advanced Audit Policy Configuration node. For more information about Advanced Audit Policy Configuration, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140969.

Values: Success + Failure.

Audit policy change

Defines if Windows logs successful and/or failed attempts to change user rights assignment policy, audit policy, account policy, or trust policy.

Description:

This security setting determines whether the OS audits each instance of attempts to change user rights assignment policy, audit policy, account policy, or trust policy.

The administrator can specify whether to audit only successes, only failures, both successes and failures, or to not audit these events at all (i.e. neither successes nor failures).

If Success auditing is enabled, an audit entry is generated when an attempted change to user rights assignment policy, audit policy, or trust policy is successful.

If Failure auditing is enabled, an audit entry is generated when an attempted change to user rights assignment policy, audit policy, or trust policy is attempted by an account that is not authorized to make the requested policy change.

Default:
 Audit Policy Change: Success
 Authentication Policy Change: Success
 Authorization Policy Change: No Auditing
 MPSSVC Rule-Level Policy Change: No Auditing
 Filtering Platform Policy Change: No Auditing
 Other Policy Change Events: No Auditing

Important: For more control over auditing policies, use the settings in the Advanced Audit Policy Configuration node. For more information about Advanced Audit Policy Configuration, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140969.

Values: Success + Failure.

Audit privilege use

Defines if Windows logs successful and/or failed attempts to execute a user right.

Description:

This security setting determines whether to audit each instance of a user exercising a user right.

If you define this policy setting, you can specify whether to audit successes, audit failures, or not audit this type of event at all. Success audits generate an audit entry when the exercise of a user right succeeds. Failure audits generate an audit entry when the exercise of a user right fails.

To set this value to No auditing, in the Properties dialog box for this policy setting, select the Define these policy settings check box and clear the Success and Failure check boxes.

Default: No auditing.

Audits are not generated for use of the following user rights, even if success audits or failure audits are specified for Audit privilege use. Enabling auditing of these user rights tend to generate many events in the security log which may impede your computer's performance. To audit the following user rights, enable the FullPrivilegeAuditing registry key.

Bypass traverse checking Debug programs Create a token object Replace process level token Generate security audits Back up files and directories Restore files and directories

Caution

Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on the computer.

Important: For more control over auditing policies, use the settings in the Advanced Audit Policy Configuration node. For more information about Advanced Audit Policy Configuration, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140969.

Values: Success + Failure.

As stated in the description, not all user rights will be audited. If audition of all user rights is necessary the following registry key has to be created/changed (Warning: Changes to the registry might impact the computer's performance or damage the system. Use a testing environment and make backups before changing the registry):

Key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa
Name: FullPrivilegeAuditing
Type: REG_DWORD
Value: 1

Audit process tracking

Defines if Windows logs process creation, process termination, handle duplication, and indirect object access.

Description:

This security setting determines whether the OS audits process-related events such as process creation, process termination, handle duplication, and indirect object access.

If this policy setting is defined, the administrator can specify whether to audit only successes, only failures, both successes and failures, or to not audit these events at all (i.e. neither successes nor failures).

If Success auditing is enabled, an audit entry is generated each time the OS performs one of these process-related activities.

If Failure auditing is enabled, an audit entry is generated each time the OS fails to perform one of these activities.

Default: No auditing\r

Important: For more control over auditing policies, use the settings in the Advanced Audit Policy Configuration node. For more information about Advanced Audit Policy Configuration, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140969.

Values: Success + Failure.

Audit system events

Defines if Windows logs audit log related events.

Description:

This security setting determines whether the OS audits any of the following events:

• Attempted system time change • Attempted security system startup or shutdown • Attempt to load extensible authentication components • Loss of audited events due to auditing system failure • Security log size exceeding a configurable warning threshold level.

If this policy setting is defined, the administrator can specify whether to audit only successes, only failures, both successes and failures, or to not audit these events at all (i.e. neither successes nor failures).

If Success auditing is enabled, an audit entry is generated each time the OS performs one of these activities successfully.

If Failure auditing is enabled, an audit entry is generated each time the OS attempts and fails to perform one of these activities.

Default: Security State Change Success Security System Extension No Auditing System Integrity Success, Failure IPsec Driver No Auditing Other System Events Success, Failure

Important: For more control over auditing policies, use the settings in the Advanced Audit Policy Configuration node. For more information about Advanced Audit Policy Configuration, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140969.

Values: Success + Failure.

User Rights Assignment

Access Credential Manager as a trusted caller

Description:

This setting is used by Credential Manager during Backup/Restore. No accounts should have this privilege, as it is only assigned to Winlogon. Users saved credentials might be compromised if this privilege is given to other entities.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Access this computer from the network

Description:

This user right determines which users and groups are allowed to connect to the computer over the network. Remote Desktop Services are not affected by this user right.

Note: Remote Desktop Services was called Terminal Services in previous versions of Windows Server.

Default on workstations and servers: Administrators Backup Operators Users Everyone

Default on domain controllers: Administrators Authenticated Users Enterprise Domain Controllers Everyone Pre-Windows 2000 Compatible Access

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Act as part of the operating system

Description:

This user right allows a process to impersonate any user without authentication. The process can therefore gain access to the same local resources as that user.

Processes that require this privilege should use the LocalSystem account, which already includes this privilege, rather than using a separate user account with this privilege specially assigned. If your organization only uses servers that are members of the Windows Server 2003 family, you do not need to assign this privilege to your users. However, if your organization uses servers running Windows 2000 or Windows NT 4.0, you might need to assign this privilege to use applications that exchange passwords in plaintext.

Caution

Assigning this user right can be a security risk. Only assign this user right to trusted users.

Default: None.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Add workstations to domain

Description:

This security setting determines which groups or users can add workstations to a domain.

This security setting is valid only on domain controllers. By default, any authenticated user has this right and can create up to 10 computer accounts in the domain.

Adding a computer account to the domain allows the computer to participate in Active Directory-based networking. For example, adding a workstation to a domain enables that workstation to recognize accounts and groups that exist in Active Directory.

Default: Authenticated Users on domain controllers.

Note: Users who have the Create Computer Objects permission on the Active Directory computers container can also create computer accounts in the domain. The distinction is that users with permissions on the container are not restricted to the creation of only 10 computer accounts. In addition, computer accounts that are created by means of Add workstations to domain have Domain Administrators as the owner of the computer account, while computer accounts that are created by means of permissions on the computers container have the creator as the owner of the computer account. If a user has permissions on the container and also has the Add workstations to domain user right, the computer is added, based on the computer container permissions rather than on the user right.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Adjust memory quotas

Description:

This privilege determines who can change the maximum memory that can be consumed by a process.

This user right is defined in the Default Domain Controller Group Policy object (GPO) and in the local security policy of workstations and servers.

Note: This privilege is useful for system tuning, but it can be misused, for example, in a denial-of-service attack.

Default: Administrators Local Service Network Service.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Allow log on locally

Description:

Determines which users can log on to the computer.

Important

Modifying this setting may affect compatibility with clients, services, and applications. For compatibility information about this setting, see Allow log on locally (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=24268 ) at the Microsoft website.

Default:

• On workstations and servers: Administrators, Backup Operators, Power Users, Users, and Guest. • On domain controllers: Account Operators, Administrators, Backup Operators, and Print Operators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Allow log on through Remote Desktop Services

Description:

This security setting determines which users or groups have permission to log on as a Remote Desktop Services client.

Default:

On workstation and servers: Administrators, Remote Desktop Users. On domain controllers: Administrators.

Important

This setting does not have any effect on Windows 2000 computers that have not been updated to Service Pack 2.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Backup files and directories

Description:

This user right determines which users can bypass file and directory, registry, and other persistent object permissions for the purposes of backing up the system.

Specifically, this user right is similar to granting the following permissions to the user or group in question on all files and folders on the system:

Traverse Folder/Execute File List Folder/Read Data Read Attributes Read Extended Attributes Read Permissions

Caution

Assigning this user right can be a security risk. Since there is no way to be sure that a user is backing up data, stealing data, or copying data to be distributed, only assign this user right to trusted users.

Default on workstations and servers: Administrators Backup Operators.

Default on domain controllers:Administrators Backup Operators Server Operators

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Bypass traverse checking

Description:

This user right determines which users can traverse directory trees even though the user may not have permissions on the traversed directory. This privilege does not allow the user to list the contents of a directory, only to traverse directories.

This user right is defined in the Default Domain Controller Group Policy object (GPO) and in the local security policy of workstations and servers.

Default on workstations and servers: Administrators Backup Operators Users Everyone Local Service Network Service

Default on domain controllers: Administrators Authenticated Users Everyone Local Service Network Service Pre-Windows 2000 Compatible Access

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Change the system time

Description:

This user right determines which users and groups can change the time and date on the internal clock of the computer. Users that are assigned this user right can affect the appearance of event logs. If the system time is changed, events that are logged will reflect this new time, not the actual time that the events occurred.

This user right is defined in the Default Domain Controller Group Policy object (GPO) and in the local security policy of workstations and servers.

Default on workstations and servers: Administrators Local Service

Default on domain controllers: Administrators Server Operators Local Service

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Change the time zone

Description:

This user right determines which users and groups can change the time zone used by the computer for displaying the local time, which is the computer's system time plus the time zone offset. System time itself is absolute and is not affected by a change in the time zone.

This user right is defined in the Default Domain Controller Group Policy object (GPO) and in the local security policy of the workstations and servers.

Default: Administrators, Users

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Create a pagefile

Description:

This user right determines which users and groups can call an internal application programming interface (API) to create and change the size of a page file. This user right is used internally by the operating system and usually does not need to be assigned to any users.

For information about how to specify a paging file size for a given drive, see To change the size of the virtual memory paging file.

Default: Administrators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Create a token object

Description:

This security setting determines which accounts can be used by processes to create a token that can then be used to get access to any local resources when the process uses an internal application programming interface (API) to create an access token.

This user right is used internally by the operating system. Unless it is necessary, do not assign this user right to a user, group, or process other than Local System.

Caution

Assigning this user right can be a security risk. Do not assign this user right to any user, group, or process that you do not want to take over the system. Default: None

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Create a token object

Description:

This security setting determines which accounts can be used by processes to create a token that can then be used to get access to any local resources when the process uses an internal application programming interface (API) to create an access token.

This user right is used internally by the operating system. Unless it is necessary, do not assign this user right to a user, group, or process other than Local System.

Caution

Assigning this user right can be a security risk. Do not assign this user right to any user, group, or process that you do not want to take over the system. Default: None

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Create global objects

Description:

This security setting determines whether users can create global objects that are available to all sessions. Users can still create objects that are specific to their own session if they do not have this user right. Users who can create global objects could affect processes that run under other users' sessions, which could lead to application failure or data corruption.

Caution

Assigning this user right can be a security risk. Assign this user right only to trusted users.

Default:

Administrators Local Service Network Service Service

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Create permanent shared objects

Description:

This user right determines which accounts can be used by processes to create a directory object using the object manager.

This user right is used internally by the operating system and is useful to kernel-mode components that extend the object namespace. Because components that are running in kernel mode already have this user right assigned to them, it is not necessary to specifically assign it.

Default: None.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Create symbolic links

Description:

This privilege determines if the user can create a symbolic link from the computer he is logged on to.

Default: Administrator

WARNING: This privilege should only be given to trusted users. Symbolic links can expose security vulnerabilities in applications that aren't designed to handle them.

Note This setting can be used in conjunction a symlink filesystem setting that can be manipulated with the command line utility to control the kinds of symlinks that are allowed on the machine. Type 'fsutil behavior set symlinkevaluation /?' at the command line to get more information about fsutil and symbolic links.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Debug programs

Description:

This user right determines which users can attach a debugger to any process or to the kernel. Developers who are debugging their own applications do not need to be assigned this user right. Developers who are debugging new system components will need this user right to be able to do so. This user right provides complete access to sensitive and critical operating system components.

Caution

Assigning this user right can be a security risk. Only assign this user right to trusted users.

Default: Administrators

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Deny access to this computer from the network

Description:

This security setting determines which users are prevented from accessing a computer over the network. This policy setting supersedes the Access this computer from the network policy setting if a user account is subject to both policies.

Default: Guest

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Deny log on as a batch job

Description:

This security setting determines which accounts are prevented from being able to log on as a batch job. This policy setting supersedes the Log on as a batch job policy setting if a user account is subject to both policies.

Default: None.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Deny log on as a service

Description:

This security setting determines which service accounts are prevented from registering a process as a service. This policy setting supersedes the Log on as a service policy setting if an account is subject to both policies.

Note: This security setting does not apply to the System, Local Service, or Network Service accounts.

Default: None.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Deny log on locally

Description:

This security setting determines which users are prevented from logging on at the computer. This policy setting supersedes the Allow log on locally policy setting if an account is subject to both policies.

Important

If you apply this security policy to the Everyone group, no one will be able to log on locally.

Default: None.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Deny log on through Remote Desktop Services

Description:

This security setting determines which users and groups are prohibited from logging on as a Remote Desktop Services client.

Default: None.

Important

This setting does not have any effect on Windows 2000 computers that have not been updated to Service Pack 2.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Enable computer and user accounts to be trusted for delegation

Description:

This security setting determines which users can set the Trusted for Delegation setting on a user or computer object.

The user or object that is granted this privilege must have write access to the account control flags on the user or computer object. A server process running on a computer (or under a user context) that is trusted for delegation can access resources on another computer using delegated credentials of a client, as long as the client account does not have the Account cannot be delegated account control flag set.

This user right is defined in the Default Domain Controller Group Policy object (GPO) and in the local security policy of workstations and servers.

Caution

Misuse of this user right, or of the Trusted for Delegation setting, could make the network vulnerable to sophisticated attacks using Trojan horse programs that impersonate incoming clients and use their credentials to gain access to network resources.

Default: Administrators on domain controllers.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Force shutdown from a remote system

Description:

This security setting determines which users are allowed to shut down a computer from a remote location on the network. Misuse of this user right can result in a denial of service.

This user right is defined in the Default Domain Controller Group Policy object (GPO) and in the local security policy of workstations and servers.

Default:

On workstations and servers: Administrators. On domain controllers: Administrators, Server Operators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Generate security audits

Description:

This security setting determines which accounts can be used by a process to add entries to the security log. The security log is used to trace unauthorized system access. Misuse of this user right can result in the generation of many auditing events, potentially hiding evidence of an attack or causing a denial of service if the Audit: Shut down system immediately if unable to log security audits security policy setting is enabled. For more information see Audit: Shut down system immediately if unable to log security audits

Default: Local Service Network Service.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Impersonate a client after authentication

Description:

Assigning this privilege to a user allows programs running on behalf of that user to impersonate a client. Requiring this user right for this kind of impersonation prevents an unauthorized user from convincing a client to connect (for example, by remote procedure call (RPC) or named pipes) to a service that they have created and then impersonating that client, which can elevate the unauthorized user's permissions to administrative or system levels.

Caution

Assigning this user right can be a security risk. Only assign this user right to trusted users.

Default:

Administrators Local Service Network Service Service

Note: By default, services that are started by the Service Control Manager have the built-in Service group added to their access tokens. Component Object Model (COM) servers that are started by the COM infrastructure and that are configured to run under a specific account also have the Service group added to their access tokens. As a result, these services get this user right when they are started.

In addition, a user can also impersonate an access token if any of the following conditions exist.

The access token that is being impersonated is for this user. The user, in this logon session, created the access token by logging on to the network with explicit credentials. The requested level is less than Impersonate, such as Anonymous or Identify. Because of these factors, users do not usually need this user right.

For more information, search for "SeImpersonatePrivilege" in the Microsoft Platform SDK.

Warning

If you enable this setting, programs that previously had the Impersonate privilege may lose it, and they may not run.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Increase a process working set

Description:

This privilege determines which user accounts can increase or decrease the size of a process’s working set.

Default: Users

The working set of a process is the set of memory pages currently visible to the process in physical RAM memory. These pages are resident and available for an application to use without triggering a page fault. The minimum and maximum working set sizes affect the virtual memory paging behavior of a process.

Warning: Increasing the working set size for a process decreases the amount of physical memory available to the rest of the system.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Increase scheduling priority

Description:

This security setting determines which accounts can use a process with Write Property access to another process to increase the execution priority assigned to the other process. A user with this privilege can change the scheduling priority of a process through the Task Manager user interface.

Default: Administrators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Load and unload device drivers

Description:

This user right determines which users can dynamically load and unload device drivers or other code in to kernel mode. This user right does not apply to Plug and Play device drivers. It is recommended that you do not assign this privilege to other users.

Caution

Assigning this user right can be a security risk. Do not assign this user right to any user, group, or process that you do not want to take over the system.

Default on workstations and servers: Administrators.

Default on domain controllers: Administrators Print Operators

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Load pages in memory

Description:

This security setting determines which accounts can use a process to keep data in physical memory, which prevents the system from paging the data to virtual memory on disk. Exercising this privilege could significantly affect system performance by decreasing the amount of available random access memory (RAM).

Default: None.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Log on as a batch job

Description:

This security setting allows a user to be logged on by means of a batch-queue facility and is provided only for compatibility with older versions of Windows.

For example, when a user submits a job by means of the task scheduler, the task scheduler logs that user on as a batch user rather than as an interactive user.


Default: Administrators Backup Operators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Log on as a service

Description:

This security setting allows a security principal to log on as a service. Services can be configured to run under the Local System, Local Service, or Network Service accounts, which have a built in right to log on as a service. Any service that runs under a separate user account must be assigned the right.

Default setting: None.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Manage auditing and security log

Description:

This security setting determines which users can specify object access auditing options for individual resources, such as files, Active Directory objects, and registry keys.

This security setting does not allow a user to enable file and object access auditing in general. For such auditing to be enabled, the Audit object access setting in Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Local Policies\Audit Policies must be configured.

You can view audited events in the security log of the Event Viewer. A user with this privilege can also view and clear the security log.

Default: Administrators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Modify an object label

Description:

This privilege determines which user accounts can modify the integrity label of objects, such as files, registry keys, or processes owned by other users. Processes running under a user account can modify the label of an object owned by that user to a lower level without this privilege.

Default: None

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Modify firmware environment values

Description:

This security setting determines who can modify firmware environment values. Firmware environment variables are settings stored in the nonvolatile RAM of non-x86-based computers. The effect of the setting depends on the processor.

On x86-based computers, the only firmware environment value that can be modified by assigning this user right is the Last Known Good Configuration setting, which should only be modified by the system. On Itanium-based computers, boot information is stored in nonvolatile RAM. Users must be assigned this user right to run bootcfg.exe and to change the Default Operating System setting on Startup and Recovery in System Properties. On all computers, this user right is required to install or upgrade Windows.

Note: This security setting does not affect who can modify the system environment variables and user environment variables that are displayed on the Advanced tab of System Properties. For information about how to modify these variables, see To add or change the values of environment variables.

Default: Administrators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Perform volume maintenance tasks

Description:

This security setting determines which users and groups can run maintenance tasks on a volume, such as remote defragmentation.

Use caution when assigning this user right. Users with this user right can explore disks and extend files in to memory that contains other data. When the extended files are opened, the user might be able to read and modify the acquired data.

Default: Administrators

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Profile single process

Description:

This security setting determines which users can use performance monitoring tools to monitor the performance of non system processes.

Default: Administrators, Power users.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Profile system performance

Description:

This security setting determines which users can use performance monitoring tools to monitor the performance of system processes.

Default: Administrators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Remove computer from docking station

Description:

This security setting determines whether a user can undock a portable computer from its docking station without logging on.

If this policy is enabled, the user must log on before removing the portable computer from its docking station. If this policy is disabled, the user may remove the portable computer from its docking station without logging on.

Default: Administrators, Power Users, Users

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Remove a process level token

Description:

This security setting determines which user accounts can call the CreateProcessAsUser() application programming interface (API) so that one service can start another. An example of a process that uses this user right is Task Scheduler. For information about Task Scheduler, see Task Scheduler overview.

Default: Network Service, Local Service.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Restore files and directories

Description:

This security setting determines which users can bypass file, directory, registry, and other persistent objects permissions when restoring backed up files and directories, and determines which users can set any valid security principal as the owner of an object.

Specifically, this user right is similar to granting the following permissions to the user or group in question on all files and folders on the system:

Traverse Folder/Execute File Write

Caution

Assigning this user right can be a security risk. Since users with this user right can overwrite registry settings, hide data, and gain ownership of system objects, only assign this user right to trusted users.

Default:

Workstations and servers: Administrators, Backup Operators. Domain controllers: Administrators, Backup Operators, Server Operators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Shut down the system

Description:

This security setting determines which users who are logged on locally to the computer can shut down the operating system using the Shut Down command. Misuse of this user right can result in a denial of service.

Default on Workstations: Administrators, Backup Operators, Users.

Default on Servers: Administrators, Backup Operators.

Default on Domain controllers: Administrators, Backup Operators, Server Operators, Print Operators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Synchronize directory service data

Description:

This security setting determines which users and groups have the authority to synchronize all directory service data. This is also known as Active Directory synchronization.

Defaults: None.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Take ownership of file or other objects

Description:

This security setting determines which users can take ownership of any securable object in the system, including Active Directory objects, files and folders, printers, registry keys, processes, and threads.

Caution

Assigning this user right can be a security risk. Since owners of objects have full control of them, only assign this user right to trusted users.

Default: Administrators.

Values: Active Directory users and groups.

Security Options

Accounts: Administrator account status

Description:

This security setting determines whether the local Administrator account is enabled or disabled.

Notes

If you try to reenable the Administrator account after it has been disabled, and if the current Administrator password does not meet the password requirements, you cannot reenable the account. In this case, an alternative member of the Administrators group must reset the password on the Administrator account. For information about how to reset a password, see To reset a password. Disabling the Administrator account can become a maintenance issue under certain circumstances.

Under Safe Mode boot, the disabled Administrator account will only be enabled if the machine is non-domain joined and there are no other local active administrator accounts. If the computer is domain joined the disabled administrator will not be enabled.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Accounts: Block Microsoft accounts

Description:

This policy setting prevents users from adding new Microsoft accounts on this computer.

If you select the "Users can’t add Microsoft accounts" option, users will not be able to create new Microsoft accounts on this computer, switch a local account to a Microsoft account, or connect a domain account to a Microsoft account. This is the preferred option if you need to limit the use of Microsoft accounts in your enterprise.

If you select the "Users can’t add or log on with Microsoft accounts" option, existing Microsoft account users will not be able to log on to Windows. Selecting this option might make it impossible for an existing administrator on this computer to log on and manage the system.

If you disable or do not configure this policy (recommended), users will be able to use Microsoft accounts with Windows.

Values:
  • This policy is disabled
  • Users can't add Microsoft accounts
  • Users cant' add or log on with Microsoft accounts

Accounts: Guest account status

Description:

This security setting determines if the Guest account is enabled or disabled.

Default: Disabled.

Note: If the Guest account is disabled and the security option Network Access: Sharing and Security Model for local accounts is set to Guest Only, network logons, such as those performed by the Microsoft Network Server (SMB Service), will fail.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Accounts: Limit local account use of blank passwords to console logon only

Description:

This security setting determines whether local accounts that are not password protected can be used to log on from locations other than the physical computer console. If enabled, local accounts that are not password protected will only be able to log on at the computer's keyboard.

Default: Enabled.


Warning:

Computers that are not in physically secure locations should always enforce strong password policies for all local user accounts. Otherwise, anyone with physical access to the computer can log on by using a user account that does not have a password. This is especially important for portable computers. If you apply this security policy to the Everyone group, no one will be able to log on through Remote Desktop Services.

Notes

This setting does not affect logons that use domain accounts. It is possible for applications that use remote interactive logons to bypass this setting.

Note: Remote Desktop Services was called Terminal Services in previous versions of Windows Server.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Accounts: Rename administrator account

Description:

This security setting determines whether a different account name is associated with the security identifier (SID) for the account Administrator. Renaming the well-known Administrator account makes it slightly more difficult for unauthorized persons to guess this privileged user name and password combination.

Default: Administrator.

Values: String with the new user name

Accounts: Rename guest account

Description:

This security setting determines whether a different account name is associated with the security identifier (SID) for the account "Guest." Renaming the well-known Guest account makes it slightly more difficult for unauthorized persons to guess this user name and password combination.

Default: Guest.

Values: String with the new user name

Audit: Audit the access of global system objects

Description:

This security setting determines whether to audit the access of global system objects.

If this policy is enabled, it causes system objects, such as mutexes, events, semaphores and DOS devices, to be created with a default system access control list (SACL). Only named objects are given a SACL; SACLs are not given to objects without names. If the Audit object access audit policy is also enabled, access to these system objects is audited.

Note: When configuring this security setting, changes will not take effect until you restart Windows.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Audit: Audit the use of Backup and Restore privilege

Description:

This security setting determines whether to audit the use of all user privileges, including Backup and Restore, when the Audit privilege use policy is in effect. Enabling this option when the Audit privilege use policy is also enabled generates an audit event for every file that is backed up or restored.

If you disable this policy, then use of the Backup or Restore privilege is not audited even when Audit privilege use is enabled.

Note: On Windows versions prior to Windows Vista configuring this security setting, changes will not take effect until you restart Windows. Enabling this setting can cause a LOT of events, sometimes hundreds per second, during a backup operation.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Audit: Force audit policy subcategory settings (Windows Vista and later) to override audit policy category settings

Description:

Windows Vista and later versions of Windows allow audit policy to be managed in a more precise way using audit policy subcategories. Setting audit policy at the category level will override the new subcategory audit policy feature. Group Policy only allows audit policy to be set at the category level, and existing group policy may override the subcategory settings of new machines as they are joined to the domain or upgraded to Windows Vista or later versions. To allow audit policy to be managed using subcategories without requiring a change to Group Policy, there is a new registry value in Windows Vista and later versions, SCENoApplyLegacyAuditPolicy, which prevents the application of category-level audit policy from Group Policy and from the Local Security Policy administrative tool.

If the category level audit policy set here is not consistent with the events that are currently being generated, the cause might be that this registry key is set.

Default: Enabled

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Audit: Shut down system immediately if unable to log security audits

Description:

This security setting determines whether the system shuts down if it is unable to log security events.

If this security setting is enabled, it causes the system to stop if a security audit cannot be logged for any reason. Typically, an event fails to be logged when the security audit log is full and the retention method that is specified for the security log is either Do Not Overwrite Events or Overwrite Events by Days.

If the security log is full and an existing entry cannot be overwritten, and this security option is enabled, the following Stop error appears:

STOP: C0000244 {Audit Failed} An attempt to generate a security audit failed. To recover, an administrator must log on, archive the log (optional), clear the log, and reset this option as desired. Until this security setting is reset, no users, other than a member of the Administrators group will be able to log on to the system, even if the security log is not full.

Note: On Windows versions prior to Windows Vista configuring this security setting, changes will not take effect until you restart Windows.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

DCOM: Machine Access Restrictions in Security Description Definition Language (SDDL) syntax

Description:

This policy setting determines which users or groups can access DCOM application remotely or locally. This setting is used to control the attack surface of the computer for DCOM applications.

You can use this policy setting to specify access permissions to all the computers to particular users for DCOM applications in the enterprise. When you specify the users or groups that are to be given permission, the security descriptor field is populated with the Security Descriptor Definition Language representation of those groups and privileges. If the security descriptor is left blank, the policy setting is defined in the template, but it is not enforced. Users and groups can be given explicit Allow or Deny privileges on both local access and remote access.

The registry settings that are created as a result of enabling the DCOM: Machine Access Restrictions in Security Descriptor Definition Language (SDDL) syntax policy setting take precedence over (have higher priority) the previous registry settings in this area. Remote Procedure Call Services (RpcSs) checks the new registry keys in the Policies section for the computer restrictions, and these registry entries take precedence over the existing registry keys under OLE. This means that previously existing registry settings are no longer effective, and if you make changes to the existing settings, computer access permissions for users are not changed. Use care in configuring their list of users and groups.

The possible values for this policy setting are:

Blank: This represents the local security policy way of deleting the policy enforcement key. This value deletes the policy and then sets it as Not defined state. The Blank value is set by using the ACL editor and emptying the list, and then pressing OK.
SDDL: This is the Security Descriptor Definition Language representation of the groups and privileges you specify when you enable this policy.
Not Defined: This is the default value.

Note If the administrator is denied permission to access DCOM applications due to the changes made to DCOM in Windows, the administrator can use the DCOM: Machine Access Restrictions in Security Descriptor Definition Language (SDDL) syntax policy setting to manage DCOM access to the computer. The administrator can specify which users and groups can access the DCOM application on the computer both locally and remotely by using this setting. This will restore control of the DCOM application to the administrator and users. To do this, open the DCOM: Machine Access Restrictions in Security Descriptor Definition Language (SDDL) syntax setting, and click Edit Security. Specify the groups you want to include and the computer access permissions for those groups. This defines the setting and sets the appropriate SDDL value.

Values: Security descriptor

DCOM: Machine Launch Restrictions in Security Description Definition Language (SDDL) syntax

Description:

This policy setting determines which users or groups can launch or activate DCOM applications remotely or locally. This setting is used to control the attack surface of the computer for DCOM applications.

You can use this setting to grant access to all the computers to users of DCOM applications. When you define this setting, and specify the users or groups that are to be given permission, the security descriptor field is populated with the Security Descriptor Definition Language representation of those groups and privileges. If the security descriptor is left blank, the policy setting is defined in the template, but it is not enforced. Users and groups can be given explicit Allow or Deny privileges on local launch, remote launch, local activation, and remote activation.

The registry settings that are created as a result of this policy take precedence over the previous registry settings in this area. Remote Procedure Call Services (RpcSs) checks the new registry keys in the Policies section for the computer restrictions; these entries take precedence over the existing registry keys under OLE.

The possible values for this Group Policy setting are:

Blank: This represents the local security policy way of deleting the policy enforcement key. This value deletes the policy and then sets it to Not defined state. The Blank value is set by using the ACL editor and emptying the list, and then pressing OK.
SDDL: This is the Security Descriptor Definition Language representation of the groups and privileges you specify when you enable this policy.
Not Defined: This is the default value.

Note If the administrator is denied access to activate and launch DCOM applications due to the changes made to DCOM in this version of Windows, this policy setting can be used for controlling the DCOM activation and launch to the computer. The administrator can specify which users and groups can launch and activate DCOM applications on the computer both locally and remotely by using the DCOM: Machine Launch Restrictions in Security Descriptor Definition Language (SDDL) syntax policy setting. This restores control of the DCOM application to the administrator and specified users. To do this, open the DCOM: Machine Launch Restrictions in Security Descriptor Definition Language (SDDL) syntax setting, and click Edit Security. Specify the groups you want to include and the computer launch permissions for those groups. This defines the setting and sets the appropriate SDDL value.

Values: Security descriptor

Devices: Allow undock without having to log on

Description:

This security setting determines whether a portable computer can be undocked without having to log on. If this policy is enabled, logon is not required and an external hardware eject button can be used to undock the computer. If disabled, a user must log on and have the Remove computer from docking station privilege to undock the computer.

Default: Enabled.

Caution

Disabling this policy may tempt users to try and physically remove the laptop from its docking station using methods other than the external hardware eject button. Since this may cause damage to the hardware, this setting, in general, should only be disabled on laptop configurations that are physically securable.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Devices: Allows to format or eject removable media

Description:

This security setting determines who is allowed to format and eject removable NTFS media. This capability can be given to:

Administrators Administrators and Interactive Users

Default: This policy is not defined and only Administrators have this ability.

Values:
  • Administrators
  • Administrators and Power Users
  • Administrators and Interactive Users

Devices: Prevent users from installing printer drivers

Description:

For a computer to print to a shared printer, the driver for that shared printer must be installed on the local computer. This security setting determines who is allowed to install a printer driver as part of connecting to a shared printer. If this setting is enabled, only Administrators can install a printer driver as part of connecting to a shared printer. If this setting is disabled, any user can install a printer driver as part of connecting to a shared printer.

Default on servers: Enabled. Default on workstations: Disabled


Notes

This setting does not affect the ability to add a local printer. This setting does not affect Administrators.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Devices: Restrict CD-ROM access to locally logged-on user only

Description:

This security setting determines whether a CD-ROM is accessible to both local and remote users simultaneously.

If this policy is enabled, it allows only the interactively logged-on user to access removable CD-ROM media. If this policy is enabled and no one is logged on interactively, the CD-ROM can be accessed over the network.

Default: This policy is not defined and CD-ROM access is not restricted to the locally logged-on user.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Devices: Restrict floppy access to locally logged-on user only

Description:

This security setting determines whether removable floppy media are accessible to both local and remote users simultaneously.

If this policy is enabled, it allows only the interactively logged-on user to access removable floppy media. If this policy is enabled and no one is logged on interactively, the floppy can be accessed over the network.

Default: This policy is not defined and floppy disk drive access is not restricted to the locally logged-on user.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Domain controller: Allow server operators to schedule tasks

Description:

This security setting determines if Server Operators are allowed to submit jobs by means of the AT schedule facility.

Note: This security setting only affects the AT schedule facility; it does not affect the Task Scheduler facility. Default: This policy is not defined, which means that the system treats it as disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Domain controller: LDAP server signing requirements

Description:

This security setting determines whether the LDAP server requires signing to be negotiated with LDAP clients, as follows:

None: Data signing is not required in order to bind with the server. If the client requests data signing, the server supports it. Require signature: Unless TLS\SSL is being used, the LDAP data signing option must be negotiated.

Default: This policy is not defined, which has the same effect as None.

Caution

If you set the server to Require Signature, you must also set the client. Not setting the client results in loss of connection with the server.

Notes

This setting does not have any impact on LDAP simple bind or LDAP simple bind through SSL. No Microsoft LDAP clients that are shipped with Windows XP Professional use LDAP simple bind or LDAP simple bind through SSL to talk to a domain controller. If signing is required, then LDAP simple bind and LDAP simple bind through SSL requests are rejected. No Microsoft LDAP clients running Windows XP Professional or the Windows Server 2003 family use LDAP simple bind or LDAP simple bind through SSL to bind to directory service.

Values:
  • none
  • Require signing

Domain controller: Refuse machine account password changes

Description:

This security setting determines whether domain controllers will refuse requests from member computers to change computer account passwords. By default, member computers change their computer account passwords every 30 days. If enabled, the domain controller will refuse computer account password change requests.

If it is enabled, this setting does not allow a domain controller to accept any changes to a computer account's password.

Default: This policy is not defined, which means that the system treats it as Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Domain member: Digitally encrypt or sign secure channel data (always)

Description:

This security setting determines whether all secure channel traffic initiated by the domain member must be signed or encrypted.

When a computer joins a domain, a computer account is created. After that, when the system starts, it uses the computer account password to create a secure channel with a domain controller for its domain. This secure channel is used to perform operations such as NTLM pass through authentication, LSA SID/name Lookup etc.

This setting determines whether or not all secure channel traffic initiated by the domain member meets minimum security requirements. Specifically it determines whether all secure channel traffic initiated by the domain member must be signed or encrypted. If this policy is enabled, then the secure channel will not be established unless either signing or encryption of all secure channel traffic is negotiated. If this policy is disabled, then encryption and signing of all secure channel traffic is negotiated with the Domain Controller in which case the level of signing and encryption depends on the version of the Domain Controller and the settings of the following two policies:

Domain member: Digitally encrypt secure channel data (when possible) Domain member: Digitally sign secure channel data (when possible)

Default: Enabled.

Notes:

If this policy is enabled, the policy Domain member: Digitally sign secure channel data (when possible) is assumed to be enabled regardless of its current setting. This ensures that the domain member attempts to negotiate at least signing of the secure channel traffic. If this policy is enabled, the policy Domain member: Digitally sign secure channel data (when possible) is assumed to be enabled regardless of its current setting. This ensures that the domain member attempts to negotiate at least signing of the secure channel traffic. Logon information transmitted over the secure channel is always encrypted regardless of whether encryption of ALL other secure channel traffic is negotiated or not.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Domain member: Digitally encrypt secure channel data (when possible)

Description:

This security setting determines whether a domain member attempts to negotiate encryption for all secure channel traffic that it initiates.

When a computer joins a domain, a computer account is created. After that, when the system starts, it uses the computer account password to create a secure channel with a domain controller for its domain. This secure channel is used to perform operations such as NTLM pass-through authentication, LSA SID/name Lookup etc.

This setting determines whether or not the domain member attempts to negotiate encryption for all secure channel traffic that it initiates. If enabled, the domain member will request encryption of all secure channel traffic. If the domain controller supports encryption of all secure channel traffic, then all secure channel traffic will be encrypted. Otherwise only logon information transmitted over the secure channel will be encrypted. If this setting is disabled, then the domain member will not attempt to negotiate secure channel encryption.

Default: Enabled.

Important

There is no known reason for disabling this setting. Besides unnecessarily reducing the potential confidentiality level of the secure channel, disabling this setting may unnecessarily reduce secure channel throughput, because concurrent API calls that use the secure channel are only possible when the secure channel is signed or encrypted.

Note: Domain controllers are also domain members and establish secure channels with other domain controllers in the same domain as well as domain controllers in trusted domains.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Domain member: Digitally sign secure channel data (when possible)

Description:

This security setting determines whether a domain member attempts to negotiate signing for all secure channel traffic that it initiates.

When a computer joins a domain, a computer account is created. After that, when the system starts, it uses the computer account password to create a secure channel with a domain controller for its domain. This secure channel is used to perform operations such as NTLM pass through authentication, LSA SID/name Lookup etc.

This setting determines whether or not the domain member attempts to negotiate signing for all secure channel traffic that it initiates. If enabled, the domain member will request signing of all secure channel traffic. If the Domain Controller supports signing of all secure channel traffic, then all secure channel traffic will be signed which ensures that it cannot be tampered with in transit.

Default: Enabled.

Notes:

If the policy Domain member: Digitally encrypt or sign secure channel data (always) is enabled, then this policy is assumed to be enabled regardless of its current setting. Domain controllers are also domain members and establish secure channels with other domain controllers in the same domain as well as domain controllers in trusted domains.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Domain member: Disable machine account password changes

Description:

Determines whether a domain member periodically changes its computer account password. If this setting is enabled, the domain member does not attempt to change its computer account password. If this setting is disabled, the domain member attempts to change its computer account password as specified by the setting for Domain Member: Maximum age for machine account password, which by default is every 30 days.

Default: Disabled.

Notes

This security setting should not be enabled. Computer account passwords are used to establish secure channel communications between members and domain controllers and, within the domain, between the domain controllers themselves. Once it is established, the secure channel is used to transmit sensitive information that is necessary for making authentication and authorization decisions. This setting should not be used in an attempt to support dual-boot scenarios that use the same computer account. If you want to dual-boot two installations that are joined to the same domain, give the two installations different computer names.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Domain member: Maximum machine account password age

Description:

This security setting determines how often a domain member will attempt to change its computer account password.

Default: 30 days.

Important

This setting applies to Windows 2000 computers, but it is not available through the Security Configuration Manager tools on these computers.

Values: 0-999 days

Domain member: Require strong (Windows 2000 and later) session key

Description:

This security setting determines whether 128-bit key strength is required for encrypted secure channel data.

When a computer joins a domain, a computer account is created. After that, when the system starts, it uses the computer account password to create a secure channel with a domain controller within the domain. This secure channel is used to perform operations such as NTLM pass-through authentication, LSA SID/name Lookup, and so on.

Depending on what version of Windows is running on the domain controller that the domain member is communicating with and the settings of the parameters:

Domain member: Digitally encrypt or sign secure channel data (always) Domain member: Digitally encrypt secure channel data (when possible) Some or all of the information that is transmitted over the secure channel will be encrypted. This policy setting determines whether or not 128-bit key strength is required for the secure channel information that is encrypted.

If this setting is enabled, then the secure channel will not be established unless 128-bit encryption can be performed. If this setting is disabled, then the key strength is negotiated with the domain controller.

Default: Enabled.

Important

In order to take advantage of this policy on member workstations and servers, all domain controllers that constitute the member's domain must be running Windows 2000 or later. In order to take advantage of this policy on domain controllers, all domain controllers in the same domain as well as all trusted domains must run Windows 2000 or later.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Interactive logon: Display user information when session is locked

Values:
  • User display name, domain and user name
  • User display name only
  • Do not display user information

Interactive logon: Do not display last user name

Description:

This security setting determines whether the name of the last user to log on to the computer is displayed in the Windows logon screen. If this policy is enabled, the name of the last user to successfully log on is not displayed in the Logon Screen. “.

If this policy is disabled, the name of the last user to log on is displayed.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Interactive logon: Do not require CTRL + ALT + DEL

Description:

This security setting determines whether pressing CTRL+ALT+DEL is required before a user can log on.

If this policy is enabled on a computer, a user is not required to press CTRL+ALT+DEL to log on. Not having to press CTRL+ALT+DEL leaves users susceptible to attacks that attempt to intercept the users' passwords. Requiring CTRL+ALT+DEL before users log on ensures that users are communicating by means of a trusted path when entering their passwords.

If this policy is disabled, any user is required to press CTRL+ALT+DEL before logging on to Windows.

Default on domain-computers: Enabled: At least Windows 8/Disabled: Windows 7 or earlier. Default on stand-alone computers: Enabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Interactive logon: Machine account lockout threshold

Description:

The machine lockout policy is enforced only on those machines that have Bitlocker enabled for protecting OS volumes. Please ensure that appropriate recovery password backup policies are enabled.

This security setting determines the number of failed logon attempts that causes the machine to be locked out. A locked out machine can only be recovered by providing recovery key at console. You can set the value between 1 and 999 failed logon attempts. If you set the value to 0, the machine will never be locked out. Values from 1 to 3 will be interpreted as 4.

Failed password attempts against workstations or member servers that have been locked using either CTRL+ALT+DELETE or password protected screen savers counts as failed logon attempts.

The machine lockout policy is enforced only on those machines that have Bitlocker enabled for protecting OS volumes. Please ensure that the appropriate recovery password backup policies are enabled.

Default: 0.

Values: Number from 0 to 999. 0 means account will not be locked out. N = numbers of attempt before the account will be locked (1-3 will be treated as 4).

Interactive logon: Machine inactivity limit

Description:

Windows notices inactivity of a logon session, and if the amount of inactive time exceeds the inactivity limit, then the screen saver will run, locking the session.

Default: not enforced.

Values: Number from 0 to 599940. 0 means screensaver will not be shown. N = numbers of screensaver is displayed.

This policy will start the screen saver (or lock the workstation), if no user input was present for N number of seconds.

Please note: This policy applies to Windows 8 or later.

Interactive logon: Message text for users attempting to log on

Description:

This security setting specifies a text message that is displayed to users when they log on.

This text is often used for legal reasons, for example, to warn users about the ramifications of misusing company information or to warn them that their actions may be audited.

Default: No message.

Values: String containing message.

Interactive logon: Message title for users attempting to log on

Description:

This security setting allows the specification of a title to appear in the title bar of the window that contains the Interactive logon: Message text for users attempting to log on.

Default: No message.

Values: String containing title.

Interactive logon: Number of previous logons to cache (in case domain controller is not available)

Description:

Each unique user's logon information is cached locally so that, in the event that a domain controller is unavailable during subsequent logon attempts, they are able to log on. The cached logon information is stored from the previous logon session. If a domain controller is unavailable and a user's logon information is not cached, the user is prompted with this message:

There are currently no logon servers available to service the logon request.

In this policy setting, a value of 0 disables logon caching. Any value above 50 only caches 50 logon attempts. Windows supports a maximum of 50 cache entries and the number of entries consumed per user depends on the credential. For example, a maximum of 50 unique password user accounts can be cached on a Windows system, but only 25 smart card user accounts can be cached because both the password information and the smart card information are stored. When a user with cached logon information logs on again, the user’s individual cached information is replaced.

Default:

Windows Server 2008: 25

All Other Versions: 10

Values: Number from 0 to 50. 0 means no caching. N = number of logons cached.

Interactive logon: Prompt user to change password before expiration

Description:

Determines how far in advance (in days) users are warned that their password is about to expire. With this advance warning, the user has time to construct a password that is sufficiently strong.

Default: 5 days.

Values: Number from 0 to 999. 0 means no information. N = number of days before the password expires when the prompt will be displayed.

Interactive logon: Require Domain Controller authentication to unlock workstation

Description:

Logon information must be provided to unlock a locked computer. For domain accounts, this security setting determines whether a domain controller must be contacted to unlock a computer. If this setting is disabled, a user can unlock the computer using cached credentials. If this setting is enabled, a domain controller must authenticate the domain account that is being used to unlock the computer.

Default: Disabled.

Important

This setting applies to Windows 2000 computers, but it is not available through the Security Configuration Manager tools on these computers.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Interactive logon: Require smart card

Description:

This security setting requires users to log on to a computer using a smart card.

The options are:

Enabled: Users can only log on to the computer using a smart card. Disabled. Users can log on to the computer using any method. Default: Disabled.

Important

This setting will apply to any computers running Windows 2000 through changes in the registry, but the security setting is not viewable through the Security Configuration Manager tool set.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Interactive logon: Smart card removal behavior

Description:

This security setting determines what happens when the smart card for a logged-on user is removed from the smart card reader.

The options are:

No Action
Lock Workstation
Force Logoff
Disconnect if a Remote Desktop Services session 

If you click Lock Workstation in the Properties dialog box for this policy, the workstation is locked when the smart card is removed, allowing users to leave the area, take their smart card with them, and still maintain a protected session.

If you click Force Logoff in the Properties dialog box for this policy, the user is automatically logged off when the smart card is removed.

If you click Disconnect if a Remote Desktop Services session, removal of the smart card disconnects the session without logging the user off. This allows the user to insert the smart card and resume the session later, or at another smart card reader-equipped computer, without having to log on again. If the session is local, this policy functions identically to Lock Workstation.

Note: Remote Desktop Services was called Terminal Services in previous versions of Windows Server.

Default: This policy is not defined, which means that the system treats it as No action.

On Windows Vista and above: For this setting to work, the Smart Card Removal Policy service must be started.

Values:
  • No Action
  • Lock Workstation
  • Force Logoff
  • Disconnect if a Remote Desktop Services session

Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (always)

Description:

This security setting determines whether packet signing is required by the SMB client component.

The server message block (SMB) protocol provides the basis for Microsoft file and print sharing and many other networking operations, such as remote Windows administration. To prevent man-in-the-middle attacks that modify SMB packets in transit, the SMB protocol supports the digital signing of SMB packets. This policy setting determines whether SMB packet signing must be negotiated before further communication with an SMB server is permitted.

If this setting is enabled, the Microsoft network client will not communicate with a Microsoft network server unless that server agrees to perform SMB packet signing. If this policy is disabled, SMB packet signing is negotiated between the client and server.

Default: Disabled.

Important

For this policy to take effect on computers running Windows 2000, client-side packet signing must also be enabled. To enable client-side SMB packet signing, set Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (if server agrees). Computers that have this policy set will not be able to communicate with computers that do not have server-side packet signing enabled. By default, server-side packet signing is enabled only on domain controllers running Windows 2000 and later. Server-side packet signing can be enabled on computers running Windows 2000 and later by setting Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (if client agrees) Server-side packet signing can be enabled on computers running Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 3 and later by setting the following registry value to 1: HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanManServer\Parameters\EnableSecuritySignature

Server-side packet signing cannot be enabled on computers running Windows 95 or Windows 98.

Notes

All Windows operating systems support both a client-side SMB component and a server-side SMB component. To take advantage of SMB packet signing, both the client-side SMB component and server-side SMB component that are involved in a communication must have SMB packet signing either enabled or required. On Windows 2000 and later operating systems, enabling or requiring packet signing for client and server-side SMB components is controlled by the following four policy settings: Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (always) - Controls whether or not the client-side SMB component requires packet signing. Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (if server agrees) - Controls whether or not the client-side SMB component has packet signing enabled. Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (always) - Controls whether or not the server-side SMB component requires packet signing. Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (if client agrees) - Controls whether or not the server-side SMB component has packet signing enabled. If server-side SMB signing is required, a client will not be able to establish a session with that server, unless it has client-side SMB signing enabled. By default, client-side SMB signing is enabled on workstations, servers, and domain controllers. Similarly, if client-side SMB signing is required, that client will not be able to establish a session with servers that do not have packet signing enabled. By default, server-side SMB signing is enabled only on domain controllers. If server-side SMB signing is enabled, SMB packet signing will be negotiated with clients that have client-side SMB signing enabled. Using SMB packet signing can impose up to a 15 percent performance hit on file service transactions.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (if server agrees)

Description:

This security setting determines whether the SMB client attempts to negotiate SMB packet signing.

The server message block (SMB) protocol provides the basis for Microsoft file and print sharing and many other networking operations, such as remote Windows administration. To prevent man-in-the-middle attacks that modify SMB packets in transit, the SMB protocol supports the digital signing of SMB packets. This policy setting determines whether the SMB client component attempts to negotiate SMB packet signing when it connects to an SMB server.

If this setting is enabled, the Microsoft network client will ask the server to perform SMB packet signing upon session setup. If packet signing has been enabled on the server, packet signing will be negotiated. If this policy is disabled, the SMB client will never negotiate SMB packet signing.

Default: Enabled.

Notes

All Windows operating systems support both a client-side SMB component and a server-side SMB component. To take advantage of SMB packet signing, both the client-side SMB component and server-side SMB component that are involved in a communication must have SMB packet signing either enabled or required. On Windows 2000 and later, enabling or requiring packet signing for client and server-side SMB components is controlled by the following four policy settings: Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (always) - Controls whether or not the client-side SMB component requires packet signing. Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (if server agrees) - Controls whether or not the client-side SMB component has packet signing enabled. Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (always) - Controls whether or not the server-side SMB component requires packet signing. Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (if client agrees) - Controls whether or not the server-side SMB component has packet signing enabled. If server-side SMB signing is required, a client will not be able to establish a session with that server unless it has client-side SMB signing enabled. By default, client-side SMB signing is enabled on workstations, servers, and domain controllers. Similarly, if client-side SMB signing is required, that client will not be able to establish a session with servers that do not have packet signing enabled. By default, server-side SMB signing is enabled only on domain controllers. If server-side SMB signing is enabled, SMB packet signing will be negotiated with clients that have client-side SMB signing enabled. Using SMB packet signing can degrade performance up to 15 percent on file service transactions.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Microsoft network client: Send unencrypted password to third-party SMB servers

Description:

If this security setting is enabled, the Server Message Block (SMB) redirector is allowed to send plaintext passwords to non-Microsoft SMB servers that do not support password encryption during authentication.

Sending unencrypted passwords is a security risk.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Microsoft network server: Amount of idle time required before suspending session

Description:

This security setting determines the amount of continuous idle time that must pass in a Server Message Block (SMB) session before the session is suspended due to inactivity.

Administrators can use this policy to control when a computer suspends an inactive SMB session. If client activity resumes, the session is automatically reestablished.

For this policy setting, a value of 0 means to disconnect an idle session as quickly as is reasonably possible. The maximum value is 99999, which is 208 days; in effect, this value disables the policy.

Default:This policy is not defined, which means that the system treats it as 15 minutes for servers and undefined for workstations.

Values: Number from 0 to 99999. 0 means client does not disconnect. N = number of minutes after the clients disconnects.

Microsoft network server: Attempt S4U2Self to obtain claim information

Description:

This security setting is to support clients running a version of Windows prior to Windows 8 that are trying to access a file share that requires user claims. This setting determines whether the local file server will attempt to use Kerberos Service-For-User-To-Self (S4U2Self) functionality to obtain a network client principal’s claims from the client’s account domain. This setting should only be set to enabled if the file server is using user claims to control access to files, and if the file server will support client principals whose accounts may be in a domain which has client computers and domain controllers running a version of Windows prior to Windows 8.

This setting should be set to automatic (default) so that the file server can automatically evaluate whether claims are needed for the user. An administrator would want to set this setting explicitly to “Enabled” only if there are local file access policies that include user claims.

When enabled this security setting will cause the Windows file server to examine the access token of an authenticated network client principal and determine if claim information is present. If claims are not present the file server will then use the Kerberos S4U2Self feature to attempt to contact a Windows Server 2012 domain controller in the client’s account domain, and obtain a claims-enabled access token for the client principal. A claims-enabled token may be needed to access files or folders which have claim-based access control policy applied.

If this setting is disabled, the Windows file server will not attempt to obtain a claim-enabled access token for the client principal.

Default: Automatic.

Values:
  • Default
  • Enabled
  • Disabled

Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (always)

Description:

This security setting determines whether packet signing is required by the SMB server component.

The server message block (SMB) protocol provides the basis for Microsoft file and print sharing and many other networking operations, such as remote Windows administration. To prevent "man-in-the-middle" attacks that modify SMB packets in transit, the SMB protocol supports the digital signing of SMB packets. This policy setting determines whether SMB packet signing must be negotiated before further communication with an SMB client is permitted.

If this setting is enabled, the Microsoft network server will not communicate with a Microsoft network client unless that client agrees to perform SMB packet signing. If this setting is disabled, SMB packet signing is negotiated between the client and server.

Default:

Disabled for member servers. Enabled for domain controllers.

Notes

All Windows operating systems support both a client-side SMB component and a server-side SMB component. To take advantage of SMB packet signing, both the client-side SMB component and server-side SMB component that are involved in a communication must have SMB packet signing either enabled or required. On Windows 2000 and later, enabling or requiring packet signing for client and server-side SMB components is controlled by the following four policy settings: Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (always) - Controls whether or not the client-side SMB component requires packet signing. Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (if server agrees) - Controls whether or not the client-side SMB component has packet signing enabled. Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (always) - Controls whether or not the server-side SMB component requires packet signing. Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (if client agrees) - Controls whether or not the server-side SMB component has packet signing enabled. If server-side SMB signing is required, a client will not be able to establish a session with that server unless it has client-side SMB signing enabled. By default, client-side SMB signing is enabled on workstations, servers, and domain controllers. Similarly, if client-side SMB signing is required, that client will not be able to establish a session with servers that do not have packet signing enabled. By default, server-side SMB signing is enabled only on domain controllers. If server-side SMB signing is enabled, SMB packet signing will be negotiated with clients that have client-side SMB signing enabled. Using SMB packet signing can degrade performance up to 15 percent on file service transactions.

Important

For this policy to take effect on computers running Windows 2000, server-side packet signing must also be enabled. To enable server-side SMB packet signing, set the following policy: Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (if server agrees)

For Windows 2000 servers to negotiate signing with Windows NT 4.0 clients, the following registry value must be set to 1 on the Windows 2000 server: HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\lanmanserver\parameters\enableW9xsecuritysignature

Computers that have this policy set will not communicate with computers that do not have client-side packet signing enabled. Client-side packet signing can be enabled on computers running Windows 2000 and later by setting the following policy:

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (if client agrees)

Description:

This security setting determines whether the SMB server will negotiate SMB packet signing with clients that request it.

The server message block (SMB) protocol provides the basis for Microsoft file and print sharing and many other networking operations, such as remote Windows administration. To prevent man-in-the-middle attacks that modify SMB packets in transit, the SMB protocol supports the digital signing of SMB packets. This policy setting determines whether the SMB server will negotiate SMB packet signing when an SMB client requests it.

If this setting is enabled, the Microsoft network server will negotiate SMB packet signing as requested by the client. That is, if packet signing has been enabled on the client, packet signing will be negotiated. If this policy is disabled, the SMB client will never negotiate SMB packet signing.

Default: Enabled on domain controllers only.

Important

For Windows 2000 servers to negotiate signing with Windows NT 4.0 clients, the following registry value must be set to 1 on the server running Windows 2000: HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\lanmanserver\parameters\enableW9xsecuritysignature

Notes

All Windows operating systems support both a client-side SMB component and a server-side SMB component. To take advantage of SMB packet signing, both the client-side SMB component and server-side SMB component that are involved in a communication must have SMB packet signing either enabled or required. For Windows 2000 and above, enabling or requiring packet signing for client and server-side SMB components is controlled by the following four policy settings: Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (always) - Controls whether or not the client-side SMB component requires packet signing. Microsoft network client: Digitally sign communications (if server agrees) - Controls whether or not the client-side SMB component has packet signing enabled. Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (always) - Controls whether or not the server-side SMB component requires packet signing. Microsoft network server: Digitally sign communications (if client agrees) - Controls whether or not the server-side SMB component has packet signing enabled. If server-side SMB signing is required, a client will not be able to establish a session with that server unless it has client-side SMB signing enabled. By default, client-side SMB signing is enabled on workstations, servers, and domain controllers. Similarly, if client-side SMB signing is required, that client will not be able to establish a session with servers that do not have packet signing enabled. By default, server-side SMB signing is enabled only on domain controllers. If server-side SMB signing is enabled, SMB packet signing will be negotiated with clients that have client-side SMB signing enabled. Using SMB packet signing can impose up to a 15 percent performance hit on file service transactions.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Microsoft network server: Disconnect clients when logon hours expire

Description:

This security setting determines whether to disconnect users who are connected to the local computer outside their user account's valid logon hours. This setting affects the Server Message Block (SMB) component.

When this policy is enabled, it causes client sessions with the SMB Service to be forcibly disconnected when the client's logon hours expire.

If this policy is disabled, an established client session is allowed to be maintained after the client's logon hours have expired.

Default on Windows Vista and above: Enabled. Default on Windows XP: Disabled

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Microsoft network server: Server SPN target name validation level

Description:

This policy setting controls the level of validation a computer with shared folders or printers (the server) performs on the service principal name (SPN) that is provided by the client computer when it establishes a session using the server message block (SMB) protocol.

The server message block (SMB) protocol provides the basis for file and print sharing and other networking operations, such as remote Windows administration. The SMB protocol supports validating the SMB server service principal name (SPN) within the authentication blob provided by a SMB client to prevent a class of attacks against SMB servers referred to as SMB relay attacks. This setting will affect both SMB1 and SMB2.

This security setting determines the level of validation a SMB server performs on the service principal name (SPN) provided by the SMB client when trying to establish a session to an SMB server.

The options are:

Off – the SPN is not required or validated by the SMB server from a SMB client.

Accept if provided by client – the SMB server will accept and validate the SPN provided by the SMB client and allow a session to be established if it matches the SMB server’s list of SPN’s for itself. If the SPN does NOT match, the session request for that SMB client will be denied.

Required from client - the SMB client MUST send a SPN name in session setup, and the SPN name provided MUST match the SMB server that is being requested to establish a connection. If no SPN is provided by client, or the SPN provided does not match, the session is denied.

Default: Off

All Windows operating systems support both a client-side SMB component and a server-side SMB component. This setting affects the server SMB behavior, and its implementation should be carefully evaluated and tested to prevent disruptions to file and print serving capabilities. Additional information on implementing and using this to secure your SMB servers can be found at the Microsoft website (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=144505).

Values:
  • Off
  • Accept if provided by client
  • Required from client

Network access: Allow anonymous SID/Name translation

Description:

This policy setting determines whether an anonymous user can request security identifier (SID) attributes for another user.

If this policy is enabled, an anonymous user can request the SID attribute for another user. An anonymous user with knowledge of an administrator's SID could contact a computer that has this policy enabled and use the SID to get the administrator's name. This setting affects both the SID-to-name translation as well as the name-to-SID translation.

If this policy setting is disabled, an anonymous user cannot request the SID attribute for another user.

Default on workstations and member servers: Disabled. Default on domain controllers running Windows Server 2008 or later: Disabled. Default on domain controllers running Windows Server 2003 R2 or earlier: Enabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network access: Do not allow anonymous enumeration of SAM accounts

Description:

This security setting determines what additional permissions will be granted for anonymous connections to the computer.

Windows allows anonymous users to perform certain activities, such as enumerating the names of domain accounts and network shares. This is convenient, for example, when an administrator wants to grant access to users in a trusted domain that does not maintain a reciprocal trust.

This security option allows additional restrictions to be placed on anonymous connections as follows:

Enabled: Do not allow enumeration of SAM accounts. This option replaces Everyone with Authenticated Users in the security permissions for resources. Disabled: No additional restrictions. Rely on default permissions.

Default on workstations: Enabled. Default on server:Enabled.

Important

This policy has no impact on domain controllers.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network access: Do not allow anonymous enumeration of SAM accounts and shares

Description:

This security setting determines whether anonymous enumeration of SAM accounts and shares is allowed.

Windows allows anonymous users to perform certain activities, such as enumerating the names of domain accounts and network shares. This is convenient, for example, when an administrator wants to grant access to users in a trusted domain that does not maintain a reciprocal trust. If you do not want to allow anonymous enumeration of SAM accounts and shares, then enable this policy.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network access: Do not allow storage of passwords and credentials for network authentication

Description:

This security setting determines whether Credential Manager saves passwords and credentials for later use when it gains domain authentication.

If you enable this setting, Credential Manager does not store passwords and credentials on the computer. If you disable or do not configure this policy setting, Credential Manager will store passwords and credentials on this computer for later use for domain authentication.

Note: When configuring this security setting, changes will not take effect until you restart Windows.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network access: Let Everyone permissions apply to anonymous users

Description:

This security setting determines what additional permissions are granted for anonymous connections to the computer.

Windows allows anonymous users to perform certain activities, such as enumerating the names of domain accounts and network shares. This is convenient, for example, when an administrator wants to grant access to users in a trusted domain that does not maintain a reciprocal trust. By Default, the Everyone security identifier (SID) is removed from the token created for anonymous connections. Therefore, permissions granted to the Everyone group do not apply to anonymous users. If this option is set, anonymous users can only access those resources for which the anonymous user has been explicitly given permission.

If this policy is enabled, the Everyone SID is added to the token that is created for anonymous connections. In this case, anonymous users are able to access any resource for which the Everyone group has been given permissions.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network access: Named pipes that can be accessed anonymously

Description:

This security setting determines which communication sessions (pipes) will have attributes and permissions that allow anonymous access.

Default: None.

Values: List of named pipes anonymously accessible

Network access: Remotely accessible registry paths

Description:

This security setting determines which registry keys can be accessed over the network, regardless of the users or groups listed in the access control list (ACL) of the winreg registry key.

Default:

System\CurrentControlSet\Control\ProductOptions System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Server Applications Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion

Caution

Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on the computer.

Note: This security setting is not available on earlier versions of Windows. The security setting that appears on computers running Windows XP, "Network access: Remotely accessible registry paths" corresponds to the "Network access: Remotely accessible registry paths and subpaths" security option on members of the Windows Server 2003 family. For more information, see Network access: Remotely accessible registry paths and subpaths.

Default:

System\CurrentControlSet\Control\ProductOptions System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Server Applications Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion

Values: List of registry paths anonymously accessible

Network access: Remotely accessible registry paths and subpaths

Description:

This security setting determines which registry paths and subpaths can be accessed over the network, regardless of the users or groups listed in the access control list (ACL) of the winreg registry key.

Default:

System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Print\Printers System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Eventlog Software\Microsoft\OLAP Server Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Print Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Windows System\CurrentControlSet\Control\ContentIndex System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server\UserConfig System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server\DefaultUserConfiguration Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Perflib System\CurrentControlSet\Services\SysmonLog System\CurrentControlSet\Services\CertSvc System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Wins

Caution

Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on the computer.

Note: On Windows XP, this security setting was called "Network access: Remotely accessible registry paths." If you configure this setting on a member of the Windows Server 2003 family that is joined to a domain, this setting is inherited by computers running Windows XP, but will appear as the "Network access: Remotely accessible registry paths" security option. For more information, see Network access: Remotely accessible registry paths and subpaths.

Values: List of registry paths anonymously accessible

Network access: Restrict anonymous access to Named Pipes and Shares

Description:

When enabled, this security setting restricts anonymous access to shares and pipes to the settings for:

Network access: Named pipes that can be accessed anonymously Network access: Shares that can be accessed anonymously Default: Enabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network access: Shares that can be accessed anonymously

Description:

This security setting determines which network shares can accessed by anonymous users.

Default: None specified.

Values: List of shares anonymously accessible

Network access: Sharing and security model for local accounts

Description:

This security setting determines how network logons that use local accounts are authenticated. If this setting is set to Classic, network logons that use local account credentials authenticate by using those credentials. The Classic model allows fine control over access to resources. By using the Classic model, you can grant different types of access to different users for the same resource. If this setting is set to Guest only, network logons that use local accounts are automatically mapped to the Guest account. By using the Guest model, you can have all users treated equally. All users authenticate as Guest, and they all receive the same level of access to a given resource, which can be either Read-only or Modify.

Default on domain computers: Classic. Default on stand-alone computers: Guest only

Important

With the Guest only model, any user who can access your computer over the network (including anonymous Internet users) can access your shared resources. You must use the Windows Firewall or another similar device to protect your computer from unauthorized access. Similarly, with the Classic model, local accounts must be password protected; otherwise, those user accounts can be used by anyone to access shared system resources.

Note:

This setting does not affect interactive logons that are performed remotely by using such services as Telnet or Remote Desktop Services

Remote Desktop Services was called Terminal Services in previous versions of Windows Server.

This policy will have no impact on computers running Windows 2000. When the computer is not joined to a domain, this setting also modifies the Sharing and Security tabs in File Explorer to correspond to the sharing and security model that is being used.

Values:
  • Classic - local users authenticate as themselves
  • Guest only - local users authenticate as Guest

Network security: Allow Local System to use computer identity for NTLM

Description:

This policy setting allows Local System services that use Negotiate to use the computer identity when reverting to NTLM authentication.

If you enable this policy setting, services running as Local System that use Negotiate will use the computer identity. This might cause some authentication requests between Windows operating systems to fail and log an error.

If you do not configure this policy setting, services running as Local System that use Negotiate when reverting to NTLM authentication will authenticate anonymously. This was the behavior in previous versions of Windows.

This policy is supported on at least Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network security: Allow LocalSystem NULL session fallback

Description:

Allow NTLM to fall back to NULL session when used with LocalSystem.

The default is TRUE up to Windows Vista and FALSE in Windows 7.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network security: Allow PKU2U authentication requests to this computer to use online identities.

Description:

This policy will be turned off by default on domain joined machines. This would prevent online identities from authenticating to the domain joined machine.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network security: Configure encryption types allowed for Kerberos

Description:

This policy setting allows you to set the encryption types that Kerberos is allowed to use.

If not selected, the encryption type will not be allowed. This setting may affect compatibility with client computers or services and applications. Multiple selections are permitted.

This policy is supported on at least Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2.

Values:
  • DES_CBC_CRC
  • DES_CBC_MD5
  • RC4_HMAC_MD5
  • AES128_HMAC_SHA1
  • AES256_HMAC_SHA1
  • Future encryption types

Network security: Do not store LAN Manager hash value on next password change

Description:

This security setting determines if, at the next password change, the LAN Manager (LM) hash value for the new password is stored. The LM hash is relatively weak and prone to attack, as compared with the cryptographically stronger Windows NT hash. Since the LM hash is stored on the local computer in the security database the passwords can be compromised if the security database is attacked.


Default on Windows Vista and above: Enabled Default on Windows XP: Disabled.

Important

Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 (SP2) and above offer compatibility with authentication to previous versions of Windows, such as Microsoft Windows NT 4.0. This setting can affect the ability of computers running Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows XP, and the Windows Server 2003 family to communicate with computers running Windows 95 and Windows 98.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network security: Do not store LAN Manager hash value on next password change

Description:

This security setting determines if, at the next password change, the LAN Manager (LM) hash value for the new password is stored. The LM hash is relatively weak and prone to attack, as compared with the cryptographically stronger Windows NT hash. Since the LM hash is stored on the local computer in the security database the passwords can be compromised if the security database is attacked.


Default on Windows Vista and above: Enabled Default on Windows XP: Disabled.

Important

Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 (SP2) and above offer compatibility with authentication to previous versions of Windows, such as Microsoft Windows NT 4.0. This setting can affect the ability of computers running Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows XP, and the Windows Server 2003 family to communicate with computers running Windows 95 and Windows 98.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network security: Force logoff when logon hours expire

Description:

This security setting determines whether to disconnect users who are connected to the local computer outside their user account's valid logon hours. This setting affects the Server Message Block (SMB) component.

When this policy is enabled, it causes client sessions with the SMB server to be forcibly disconnected when the client's logon hours expire.

If this policy is disabled, an established client session is allowed to be maintained after the client's logon hours have expired.

Default: Enabled.

Note: This security setting behaves as an account policy. For domain accounts, there can be only one account policy. The account policy must be defined in the Default Domain Policy, and it is enforced by the domain controllers that make up the domain. A domain controller always pulls the account policy from the Default Domain Policy Group Policy object (GPO), even if there is a different account policy applied to the organizational unit that contains the domain controller. By default, workstations and servers that are joined to a domain (for example, member computers) also receive the same account policy for their local accounts. However, local account policies for member computers can be different from the domain account policy by defining an account policy for the organizational unit that contains the member computers. Kerberos settings are not applied to member computers.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Network security: LAN Manager authentication level

Description:

This security setting determines which challenge/response authentication protocol is used for network logons. This choice affects the level of authentication protocol used by clients, the level of session security negotiated, and the level of authentication accepted by servers as follows:

Send LM & NTLM responses: Clients use LM and NTLM authentication and never use NTLMv2 session security; domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

Send LM & NTLM - use NTLMv2 session security if negotiated: Clients use LM and NTLM authentication and use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it; domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

Send NTLM response only: Clients use NTLM authentication only and use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it; domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

Send NTLMv2 response only: Clients use NTLMv2 authentication only and use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it; domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

Send NTLMv2 response only\refuse LM: Clients use NTLMv2 authentication only and use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it; domain controllers refuse LM (accept only NTLM and NTLMv2 authentication).

Send NTLMv2 response only\refuse LM & NTLM: Clients use NTLMv2 authentication only and use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it; domain controllers refuse LM and NTLM (accept only NTLMv2 authentication).

Important

This setting can affect the ability of computers running Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows XP Professional, and the Windows Server 2003 family to communicate with computers running Windows NT 4.0 and earlier over the network. For example, at the time of this writing, computers running Windows NT 4.0 SP4 and earlier did not support NTLMv2. Computers running Windows 95 and Windows 98 did not support NTLM.

Default:

Windows 2000 and windows XP: send LM & NTLM responses

Windows Server 2003: Send NTLM response only

Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2: Send NTLMv2 response only

Values:
  • Send LM & NTLM responses
  • Send LM & NTLM - use NTLMv2 session security if negotiated
  • Send NTLM resonse only
  • Send NTLMv2 response only
  • Send NTLMv2 response only. Refuse LM
  • Send NTLMv2 response only. Refuse LM & NTLM

Network security: LDAP client signing requirements

Description:

This security setting determines the level of data signing that is requested on behalf of clients issuing LDAP BIND requests, as follows:

None: The LDAP BIND request is issued with the options that are specified by the caller. Negotiate signing: If Transport Layer Security/Secure Sockets Layer (TLS\SSL) has not been started, the LDAP BIND request is initiated with the LDAP data signing option set in addition to the options specified by the caller. If TLS\SSL has been started, the LDAP BIND request is initiated with the options that are specified by the caller. Require signature: This is the same as Negotiate signing. However, if the LDAP server's intermediate saslBindInProgress response does not indicate that LDAP traffic signing is required, the caller is told that the LDAP BIND command request failed.

Caution

If you set the server to Require signature, you must also set the client. Not setting the client results in a loss of connection with the server.

Note: This setting does not have any impact on ldap_simple_bind or ldap_simple_bind_s. No Microsoft LDAP clients that are shipped with Windows XP Professional use ldap_simple_bind or ldap_simple_bind_s to talk to a domain controller.

Default: Negotiate signing.

Values:
  • None
  • Negotiate signing
  • Require signing

Network security: Minimum session security for NTLM SSP based (including secure RPC) clients

Description:

This security setting allows a client to require the negotiation of 128-bit encryption and/or NTLMv2 session security. These values are dependent on the LAN Manager Authentication Level security setting value. The options are:

Require NTLMv2 session security: The connection will fail if NTLMv2 protocol is not negotiated. Require 128-bit encryption: The connection will fail if strong encryption (128-bit) is not negotiated.

Default:

Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 2000 Server, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Server 2008: No requirements.

Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2: Require 128-bit encryption

Values:
  • Require NTLMv2 session security
  • Require 128-bit encryption

Network security: Minimum session security for NTLM SSP based (including secure RPC) servers

Description:

This security setting allows a server to require the negotiation of 128-bit encryption and/or NTLMv2 session security. These values are dependent on the LAN Manager Authentication Level security setting value. The options are:

Require NTLMv2 session security: The connection will fail if message integrity is not negotiated. Require 128-bit encryption. The connection will fail if strong encryption (128-bit) is not negotiated.

Default:

Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 2000 Server, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Server 2008: No requirements.

Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2: Require 128-bit encryption

Values:
  • Require NTLMv2 session security
  • Require 128-bit encryption

Network security: Restrict NTLM: Add remote server exceptions for NTLM authentication

Description:

This policy setting allows you to create an exception list of remote servers to which clients are allowed to use NTLM authentication if the "Network Security: Restrict NTLM: Outgoing NTLM traffic to remote servers" policy setting is configured.

If you configure this policy setting, you can define a list of remote servers to which clients are allowed to use NTLM authentication.

If you do not configure this policy setting, no exceptions will be applied.

The naming format for servers on this exception list is the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) or NetBIOS server name used by the application, listed one per line. To ensure exceptions the name used by all applications needs to be in the list, and to ensure an exception is accurate, the server name should be listed in both naming formats . A single asterisk (*) can be used anywhere in the string as a wildcard character.

Values: List of remote servers

Network security: Restrict NTLM: Add server exceptions in this domain

Description:

This policy setting allows you to create an exception list of servers in this domain to which clients are allowed to use NTLM pass-through authentication if the "Network Security: Restrict NTLM: Deny NTLM authentication in this domain" is set.

If you configure this policy setting, you can define a list of servers in this domain to which clients are allowed to use NTLM authentication.

If you do not configure this policy setting, no exceptions will be applied.

The naming format for servers on this exception list is the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) or NetBIOS server name used by the calling application listed one per line. A single asterisk (*) can be used at the beginning or end of the string as a wildcard character.

Values: List of servers

Network security: Restrict NTLM: Audit Incoming NTLM Traffic

Description:

This policy setting allows you to audit incoming NTLM traffic.

If you select "Disable", or do not configure this policy setting, the server will not log events for incoming NTLM traffic.

If you select "Enable auditing for domain accounts", the server will log events for NTLM pass-through authentication requests that would be blocked when the "Network Security: Restrict NTLM: Incoming NTLM traffic" policy setting is set to the "Deny all domain accounts" option.

If you select "Enable auditing for all accounts", the server will log events for all NTLM authentication requests that would be blocked when the "Network Security: Restrict NTLM: Incoming NTLM traffic" policy setting is set to the "Deny all accounts" option.

This policy is supported on at least Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2.

Note: Audit events are recorded on this computer in the "Operational" Log located under the Applications and Services Log/Microsoft/Windows/NTLM.

Values:
  • Disable
  • Enable auditing for domain accounts
  • Enable auditing for all accounts

Network security: Restrict NTLM: Audit NTLM authentication in this domain

Description:

This policy setting allows you to audit NTLM authentication in a domain from this domain controller.

If you select "Disable" or do not configure this policy setting, the domain controller will not log events for NTLM authentication in this domain.

If you select "Enable for domain accounts to domain servers," the domain controller will log events for NTLM authentication logon attempts for domain accounts to domain servers when NTLM authentication would be denied because "Deny for domain accounts to domain servers" is selected in the "Network security: Restrict NTLM: NTLM authentication in this domain" policy setting.

If you select "Enable for domain accounts," the domain controller will log events for NTLM authentication logon attempts that use domain accounts when NTLM authentication would be denied because "Deny for domain accounts" is selected in the "Network security: Restrict NTLM: NTLM authentication in this domain" policy setting.

If you select "Enable for domain servers" the domain controller will log events for NTLM authentication requests to all servers in the domain when NTLM authentication would be denied because "Deny for domain servers" is selected in the "Network security: Restrict NTLM: NTLM authentication in this domain" policy setting.

If you select "Enable all" the domain controller will log events for NTLM pass-through authentication requests from its servers and for its accounts which would be denied because "Deny all" is selected in the "Network security: Restrict NTLM: NTLM authentication in this domain" policy setting.

This policy is supported on at least Windows Server 2008 R2.

Note: Audit events are recorded on this computer in the "Operational" Log located under the Applications and Services Log/Microsoft/Windows/NTLM.

Values:
  • Disable
  • Enable for domain accounts to domain servers
  • Enable for domain accounts
  • Enable for domain servers
  • Enable all

Network security: Restrict NTLM: Incoming NTLM traffic

Description:

This policy setting allows you to deny or allow incoming NTLM traffic.

If you select "Allow all" or do not configure this policy setting, the server will allow all NTLM authentication requests.

If you select "Deny all domain accounts," the server will deny NTLM authentication requests for domain logon and display an NTLM blocked error, but allow local account logon.

If you select "Deny all accounts," the server will deny NTLM authentication requests from incoming traffic and display an NTLM blocked error.

This policy is supported on at least Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2.

Note: Block events are recorded on this computer in the "Operational" Log located under the Applications and Services Log/Microsoft/Windows/NTLM.

Values:
  • Allow all
  • Deny all domain accounts
  • Deny all accounts

Network security: Restrict NTLM: NTLM authentication in this domain

Description:

This policy setting allows you to deny or allow NTLM authentication within a domain from this domain controller. This policy does not affect interactive logon to this domain controller.

If you select "Disabled" or do not configure this policy setting, the domain controller will allow all NTLM pass-through authentication requests within the domain.

If you select "Deny for domain accounts to domain servers" the domain controller will deny all NTLM authentication logon attempts to all servers in the domain that are using domain accounts and return an NTLM blocked error unless the server name is on the exception list in the "Network security: Restrict NTLM: Add server exceptions for NTLM authentication in this domain" policy setting.

If you select "Deny for domain account" the domain controller will deny all NTLM authentication logon attempts from domain accounts and return an NTLM blocked error unless the server name is on the exception list in the "Network security: Restrict NTLM: Add server exceptions for NTLM authentication in this domain" policy setting.

If you select "Deny for domain servers" the domain controller will deny NTLM authentication requests to all servers in the domain and return an NTLM blocked error unless the server name is on the exception list in the "Network security: Restrict NTLM: Add server exceptions for NTLM authentication in this domain" policy setting.

If you select "Deny all," the domain controller will deny all NTLM pass-through authentication requests from its servers and for its accounts and return an NTLM blocked error unless the server name is on the exception list in the "Network security: Restrict NTLM: Add server exceptions for NTLM authentication in this domain" policy setting.

This policy is supported on at least Windows Server 2008 R2.

Note: Block events are recorded on this computer in the "Operational" Log located under the Applications and Services Log/Microsoft/Windows/NTLM.

Values:
  • Disable
  • Deny for domain accounts to domain servers
  • Deny for domain accounts
  • Deny for domain servers
  • Deny all

Network security: Restrict NTLM: Outgoing NTLM traffic to remote servers

Description:

This policy setting allows you to deny or audit outgoing NTLM traffic from this Windows 7 or this Windows Server 2008 R2 computer to any Windows remote server.

If you select "Allow all" or do not configure this policy setting, the client computer can authenticate identities to a remote server by using NTLM authentication.

If you select "Audit all," the client computer logs an event for each NTLM authentication request to a remote server. This allows you to identify those servers receiving NTLM authentication requests from the client computer.

If you select "Deny all," the client computer cannot authenticate identities to a remote server by using NTLM authentication. You can use the "Network security: Restrict NTLM: Add remote server exceptions for NTLM authentication" policy setting to define a list of remote servers to which clients are allowed to use NTLM authentication.

This policy is supported on at least Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2.

Note: Audit and block events are recorded on this computer in the "Operational" Log located under the Applications and Services Log/Microsoft/Windows/NTLM.

Values:
  • Allow all
  • Audit all
  • Deny all

Recovery console: Allow automatic administrative logon

Description:

This security setting determines if the password for the Administrator account must be given before access to the system is granted. If this option is enabled, the Recovery Console does not require you to provide a password, and it automatically logs on to the system.

Default: This policy is not defined and automatic administrative logon is not allowed.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Recovery console: Recovery console: Allow floppy copy and access to all drives and all folders

Description:

Enabling this security option makes the Recovery Console SET command available, which allows you to set the following Recovery Console environment variables:

AllowWildCards: Enable wildcard support for some commands (such as the DEL command). AllowAllPaths: Allow access to all files and folders on the computer. AllowRemovableMedia: Allow files to be copied to removable media, such as a floppy disk. NoCopyPrompt: Do not prompt when overwriting an existing file.

Default: This policy is not defined and the recover console SET command is not available.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Shutdown: Allow system to be shut down without having to log on

Description:

This security setting determines whether a computer can be shut down without having to log on to Windows.

When this policy is enabled, the Shut Down command is available on the Windows logon screen.

When this policy is disabled, the option to shut down the computer does not appear on the Windows logon screen. In this case, users must be able to log on to the computer successfully and have the Shut down the system user right before they can perform a system shutdown.

Default on workstations: Enabled. Default on servers: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

Shutdown: Clear virtual memory pagefile

Description:

This security setting determines whether the virtual memory pagefile is cleared when the system is shut down.

Virtual memory support uses a system pagefile to swap pages of memory to disk when they are not used. On a running system, this pagefile is opened exclusively by the operating system, and it is well protected. However, systems that are configured to allow booting to other operating systems might have to make sure that the system pagefile is wiped clean when this system shuts down. This ensures that sensitive information from process memory that might go into the pagefile is not available to an unauthorized user who manages to directly access the pagefile.

When this policy is enabled, it causes the system pagefile to be cleared upon clean shutdown. If you enable this security option, the hibernation file (hiberfil.sys) is also zeroed out when hibernation is disabled.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

System Cryptography: Force strong key protection for user keys stored on the computer

Description:

This security setting determines if users' private keys require a password to be used.

The options are:

User input is not required when new keys are stored and used User is prompted when the key is first used User must enter a password each time they use a key For more information, see Public key infrastructure.

Default: This policy is not defined.

Values:
  • User input is not required when new keys are stored and used
  • User is prompted when the key is first used
  • User must enter a password each time they use a key

System cryptography: Use FIPS 140 compliant cryptographic algorithms, including encryption, hashing and signing algorithms

Description:

For the Schannel Security Service Provider (SSP), this security setting disables the weaker Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocols and supports only the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocols as a client and as a server (if applicable). If this setting is enabled, Transport Layer Security/Secure Sockets Layer (TLS/SSL) Security Provider uses only the FIPS 140 approved cryptographic algorithms: 3DES and AES for encryption, RSA or ECC public key cryptography for the TLS key exchange and authentication, and only the Secure Hashing Algorithm (SHA1, SHA256, SHA384, and SHA512) for the TLS hashing requirements.

For Encrypting File System Service (EFS), it supports the Triple Data Encryption Standard (DES) and Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) encryption algorithms for encrypting file data supported by the NTFS file system. By default, EFS uses the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm with a 256-bit key in the Windows Server 2003 and Windows Vista family and DESX algorithm in Windows XP for encrypting file data. For information about EFS, see Encrypting File System.

For Remote Desktop Services, it supports only the Triple DES encryption algorithm for encrypting Remote Desktop Services network communication.

Note: Remote Desktop Services was called Terminal Services in previous versions of Windows Server.

For BitLocker, this policy needs to be enabled before any encryption key is generated. Recovery passwords created when this policy is enabled are incompatible with BitLocker on Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, and earlier operating systems. If this policy is applied to computers running operating systems prior to Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2, BitLocker will prevent the creation or use of recovery passwords; recovery keys should be used for those computers instead.

Default: Disabled.

Note: The Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 140 is a security implementation designed for certifying cryptographic software. FIPS 140 validated software is required by the U.S. Government and requested by other prominent institutions.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

System objects: Require case insensitivity for non-Windows subsystems

Description:

This security setting determines whether case insensitivity is enforced for all subsystems. The Win32 subsystem is case insensitive. However, the kernel supports case sensitivity for other subsystems, such as POSIX.

If this setting is enabled, case insensitivity is enforced for all directory objects, symbolic links, and IO objects, including file objects. Disabling this setting does not allow the Win32 subsystem to become case sensitive.

Default: Enabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

System objects: Strengthen default permissions of internal system objects (e.g., Symbolic Links)

Description:

This security setting determines the strength of the default discretionary access control list (DACL) for objects.

Active Directory maintains a global list of shared system resources, such as DOS device names, mutexes, and semaphores. In this way, objects can be located and shared among processes. Each type of object is created with a default DACL that specifies who can access the objects and what permissions are granted.

If this policy is enabled, the default DACL is stronger, allowing users who are not administrators to read shared objects but not allowing these users to modify shared objects that they did not create.

Default: Enabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

System settings: Optional subsystems

Description:

This security setting determines which subsystems can optionally be started up to support your applications. With this security setting, you can specify as many subsystems to support your applications as your environment demands.

Default: POSIX.

Values: List of subsystems

System settings: Use Certificate Rules on Windows Executables for Software Restriction Policies

Description:

This security setting determines if digital certificates are processed when a user or process attempts to run software with an .exe file name extension. This security settings is used to enable or disable certificate rules, a type of software restriction policies rule. With software restriction policies, you can create a certificate rule that will allow or disallow software that is signed by Authenticode to run, based on the digital certificate that is associated with the software. In order for certificate rules to take effect, you must enable this security setting.

When certificate rules are enabled, software restriction policies will check a certificate revocation list (CRL) to make sure the software's certificate and signature are valid. This may decrease performance when start signed programs. You can disable this feature. On Trusted Publishers Properties, clear the Publisher and Timestamp check boxes. For more information, see Set trusted publisher options.

Default: Disabled.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

User Account Control: Use Admin Approval Mode for the built-in Administrator account

Description:

This policy setting controls the behavior of Admin Approval Mode for the built-in Administrator account.

The options are:

• Enabled: The built-in Administrator account uses Admin Approval Mode. By default, any operation that requires elevation of privilege will prompt the user to approve the operation.

• Disabled: (Default) The built-in Administrator account runs all applications with full administrative privilege.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

User Account Control: Allow UIAccess applications to prompt for elevation without using the secure desktop.

Description:

This policy setting controls whether User Interface Accessibility (UIAccess or UIA) programs can automatically disable the secure desktop for elevation prompts used by a standard user.

• Enabled: UIA programs, including Windows Remote Assistance, automatically disable the secure desktop for elevation prompts. If you do not disable the "User Account Control: Switch to the secure desktop when prompting for elevation" policy setting, the prompts appear on the interactive user's desktop instead of the secure desktop.

• Disabled: (Default) The secure desktop can be disabled only by the user of the interactive desktop or by disabling the "User Account Control: Switch to the secure desktop when prompting for elevation" policy setting.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

User Account Control: Behavior of the elevation prompt for administrators in Admin Approval Mode

Description:

This policy setting controls the behavior of the elevation prompt for administrators.

The options are:

• Elevate without prompting: Allows privileged accounts to perform an operation that requires elevation without requiring consent or credentials. Note: Use this option only in the most constrained environments.

• Prompt for credentials on the secure desktop: When an operation requires elevation of privilege, the user is prompted on the secure desktop to enter a privileged user name and password. If the user enters valid credentials, the operation continues with the user's highest available privilege.

• Prompt for consent on the secure desktop: When an operation requires elevation of privilege, the user is prompted on the secure desktop to select either Permit or Deny. If the user selects Permit, the operation continues with the user's highest available privilege.

• Prompt for credentials: When an operation requires elevation of privilege, the user is prompted to enter an administrative user name and password. If the user enters valid credentials, the operation continues with the applicable privilege.

• Prompt for consent: When an operation requires elevation of privilege, the user is prompted to select either Permit or Deny. If the user selects Permit, the operation continues with the user's highest available privilege.

• Prompt for consent for non-Windows binaries: (Default) When an operation for a non-Microsoft application requires elevation of privilege, the user is prompted on the secure desktop to select either Permit or Deny. If the user selects Permit, the operation continues with the user's highest available privilege.

Values:
  • Elevate without prompting
  • Prompt for credentials on the secure desktop
  • Prompt for consent on the secure desktop
  • Prompt for credentials
  • Prompt for consent
  • Prompt for consent for non-Windows binaries

User Account Control: Behavior of the elevation prompt for standard users

Description:

This policy setting controls the behavior of the elevation prompt for standard users.

The options are:

• Prompt for credentials: (Default) When an operation requires elevation of privilege, the user is prompted to enter an administrative user name and password. If the user enters valid credentials, the operation continues with the applicable privilege.

• Automatically deny elevation requests: When an operation requires elevation of privilege, a configurable access denied error message is displayed. An enterprise that is running desktops as standard user may choose this setting to reduce help desk calls.

• Prompt for credentials on the secure desktop: When an operation requires elevation of privilege, the user is prompted on the secure desktop to enter a different user name and password. If the user enters valid credentials, the operation continues with the applicable privilege.

Values:
  • Automatically deny elevation requests
  • Prompt for credentials on the secure desktop
  • Prompt for credentials

User Account Control: Detect application installations and prompt for elevation

Description:

This policy setting controls the behavior of application installation detection for the computer.

The options are:

• Enabled: (Default) When an application installation package is detected that requires elevation of privilege, the user is prompted to enter an administrative user name and password. If the user enters valid credentials, the operation continues with the applicable privilege.

• Disabled: Application installation packages are not detected and prompted for elevation. Enterprises that are running standard user desktops and use delegated installation technologies such as Group Policy Software Installation or Systems Management Server (SMS) should disable this policy setting. In this case, installer detection is unnecessary.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

User Account Control: Only elevate executable files that are signed and validated

Description:

This policy setting enforces public key infrastructure (PKI) signature checks for any interactive applications that request elevation of privilege. Enterprise administrators can control which applications are allowed to run by adding certificates to the Trusted Publishers certificate store on local computers.

The options are:

• Enabled: Enforces the PKI certification path validation for a given executable file before it is permitted to run.

• Disabled: (Default) Does not enforce PKI certification path validation before a given executable file is permitted to run.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

User Account Control: Only elevate UIAccess applications that are installed in secure locations

Description:

This policy setting controls whether applications that request to run with a User Interface Accessibility (UIAccess) integrity level must reside in a secure location in the file system. Secure locations are limited to the following:

- …\Program Files\, including subfolders - …\Windows\system32\ - …\Program Files (x86)\, including subfolders for 64-bit versions of Windows

Note: Windows enforces a public key infrastructure (PKI) signature check on any interactive application that requests to run with a UIAccess integrity level regardless of the state of this security setting.

The options are:

• Enabled: (Default) If an application resides in a secure location in the file system, it runs only with UIAccess integrity.

• Disabled: An application runs with UIAccess integrity even if it does not reside in a secure location in the file system.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

User Account Control: Turn on Admin Approval Mode

Description:

This policy setting controls the behavior of all User Account Control (UAC) policy settings for the computer. If you change this policy setting, you must restart your computer.

The options are:

• Enabled: (Default) Admin Approval Mode is enabled. This policy must be enabled and related UAC policy settings must also be set appropriately to allow the built-in Administrator account and all other users who are members of the Administrators group to run in Admin Approval Mode.

• Disabled: Admin Approval Mode and all related UAC policy settings are disabled. Note: If this policy setting is disabled, the Security Center notifies you that the overall security of the operating system has been reduced.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

User Account Control: Switch to the secure desktop when prompting for elevation

Description:

This policy setting controls whether the elevation request prompt is displayed on the interactive user's desktop or the secure desktop.

The options are:

• Enabled: (Default) All elevation requests go to the secure desktop regardless of prompt behavior policy settings for administrators and standard users.

• Disabled: All elevation requests go to the interactive user's desktop. Prompt behavior policy settings for administrators and standard users are used.

Values: Enabled/Disabled

User Account Control: Virtualize file and registry write failures to per-user locations

Description:

This policy setting controls whether application write failures are redirected to defined registry and file system locations. This policy setting mitigates applications that run as administrator and write run-time application data to %ProgramFiles%, %Windir%, %Windir%\system32, or HKLM\Software.

The options are:

• Enabled: (Default) Application write failures are redirected at run time to defined user locations for both the file system and registry.

• Disabled: Applications that write data to protected locations fail.

Values: Enabled/Disabled